Images

Pricing is More than a Number! Think!

Go Straley Group explain that market stats are not able to be discerned at a moment’s notice.  Not by a consumer or a real estate agent.  It takes study.  It is intentional.  It is unique and personal to your property, your marketplace and your location.

There is no other way.   This is why a professional agent in the market daily, for years or decades, will be your valuable resource.

It’s priceless – for the peace of mind alone.  Knowing everything has been considered.

Go Straley has visited thousands of properties over decades!  Through inspections, strategies and negotiations the experience internalizes and the results are tracked.

97670357

 

Pricing a home for a buyer, as well as a seller is critical.  There are money leaks riddling the process and most of the time you don’t even know what you lost.

 

abr-absorption

It’s not a game of asking more and settling for less.  It is a target.  It is precision.   Most often you only get one time to hit the target.  Don’t waste opportunity!

Go Straley Group gets it right the first time – every time. 

Ask about YOUR CUSTOMIZED BUYING STRATEGY!

Did you hear the woman ate a horse?

family-65211016

I pondered why the United States was uniquely dependent on employer health care.

I pondered why the United States spends $2.1 Trillion in health care each year.

My research delineates that 34% of health care is paid by private insurance, 47% by Public insurance, and 19% by consumers.

In 2006, healthcare as a percent of GDP was 16% .

These numbers just don’t seem economically correct, but reading through causes, cures, and solutions seems to be like traveling through a maze.

As a patient, if I don’t have a health care plan, providers sometimes double or triple the rate over that of the rate under and insurance plan, so I need to plan to contain the costs, but the costs of the plans are not contained either.  It does not seem like the sensible economic system where costs are shown and consumers choose purchases based on utility.

A look back in history reveals the following:

“In describing how the United States arrived in the predicament it currently finds itself, the author accurately lays the blame on decisions made 60 years ago. Wage and price controls in effect during World War II meant employers had to turn to forms of non-cash compensation to recruit or retain workers. Workers pay taxes on cash wages but not on fringe benefits like health insurance. Over time, it became common for workers to fund their family’s health care by using tax-free insurance policies obtained through employment.” Herrick, D. (2005)

I liken the whole situation to the well known nursery rhyme!
I just hope we restore some sensibility and self responsibility before we get to the “horse”!

If you don’t address the problem directly with wise open direct economic decisions, this is what happens:

There Was An Old Woman

There was an old woman who swallowed a fly,
I don’t know why she swallowed a fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old woman who swallowed a spider,
That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her,
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,
I don’t know why she swallowed the fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old woman who swallowed a bird,
How absurd! to swallow a bird,
She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,
That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her,
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,
I don’t know why she swallowed the fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old woman who swallowed a cat,
Imagine that! to swallow a cat,
She swallowed the cat to catch the bird,
She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,
That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her,
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,
I don’t know why she swallowed the fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old woman who swallowed a dog,
What a hog! to swallow a dog,
She swallowed the dog to catch the cat,
She swallowed the cat to catch the bird,
She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,
That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her,
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,
I don’t know why she swallowed the fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old woman who swallowed a goat,
Just opened her throat! to swallow a goat,
She swallowed the goat to catch the dog,
She swallowed the dog to catch the cat,
She swallowed the cat to catch the bird,
She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,
That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her,
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,
I don’t know why she swallowed the fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old woman who swallowed a cow,
I don’t know how she swallowed a cow!
She swallowed the cow to catch the goat,
She swallowed the goat to catch the dog,
She swallowed the dog to catch the cat,
She swallowed the cat to catch the bird,
She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,
That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her,
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,
I don’t know why she swallowed the fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old woman who swallowed a horse,
She’s dead—of course!

sos

 

5 Biggest Negotiation Blunders

 

According to the 2011 National Association of Realtors® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers, the second most popular reason buyers use a real estate agent is to help with the negotiation process. However, buyers can negatively impact the process making mistakes which lead to them losing their dream house. Don’t make these negotiation blunders:

1.       Not entering with a negotiating strategy: Before submitting an offer, try to remember that the seller has already decided how much money they want from the sale of their property. “Knowing how to negotiate effectively is the key to getting the best deal,” says Rebecca Straley, Accredited Buyer’s Representative “Without a plan, you might risk losing the house you want.”

2.       Giving up too soon: Buyers might get discouraged when they are competing against multiple offers on a house. However, the biggest mistake a buyer can do is panic and withdraw their offer. You should stay involved for at least one round of negotiations, but also establish your maximum price.

3.       Not providing earnest money:  Earnest money is a cash deposit you make when submitting your written offer on a property to show your “good faith.” Sellers are understandably suspicious of offers that offer a low deposit amount.”  Buyers show their desire, willingness and ability to a seller, based on the “good faith” deposit.

4.       Having too many contingencies:  A contingency is a term or condition that must be met for an offer to become a binding contract. Home buyers with too many contingencies tend to weaken an offer.  Some examples of contingencies are securing a job transfer, selling your current home or obtaining specific financing terms.  Minimizing contingencies – increases success, so use contingencies wisely.

5.       Weak negotiating position:  Sellers usually like to go with a strong bargaining position. Some examples of strong positioning is being pre-approved for a mortgage or having little to no contingencies. “With these factors in your favor, you may be able to negotiate a lower price. On the other hand, in a ‘hot’ seller’s market, if your  ‘perfect’ home comes on the market, the other buyers not the seller may be your biggest concern.” Rebecca Straley, ABR®, encourages speed of offer may be the key to unlock the door to the ‘perfect’ home.”

However, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative can counsel you on making an effective offer that will land you the house of your dreams. Straley is one of more than 40,000 members of the Real Estate Buyer’s Agent Council (REBAC) of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, who have attained the Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR®) designation. The Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR®) designation is designed for real estate buyer agents who focus on working directly with buyer-clients.  Having an ABR® can guide you through structuring your offer and negotiation strategy.

Michael and Rebecca believe an agent seeking tools through education and experience are primary assets to you as a buyer.